Introduction to the principle of fabric softening agents




The role of fabric softening agents should be explained from the adsorption characteristics of surfactants on fibers. The adsorption of cationic surfactants on the surface of fabric fibers is a prerequisite for fabrics to produce softness and antistatic properties, but the adsorption effect Negative charges can be absorbed by the positive charges of cationic surfactants. Because of the strong binding force, high temperature resistance and washing resistance, the finished fabric feels plump, smooth, and fluffy. It also improves the antistatic effect of the fabric and improves the fabric's performance. Abrasion resistance and tearing strength.

The anionic surfactant is adsorbed to the fiber surface through the finishing bath. When forming an oil film, the hydrophobic base part is often on the inner side, while the hydrophilic part is on the outer layer. Since the hydrophilic base is on the surface of the fiber, the smoothness is hindered, so use anionic surface activity. The agent-treated fiber cannot impart good flexibility to the fiber. The hand feeling of non-ionic softeners is similar to that of anionic softeners. They have poor absorption to fibers and low durability. They have almost no effect on synthetic fibers. They are mainly used in the finishing of cellulose fibers, emulsifying and smoothing in fiber oils. .

The amphoteric softener has two or more functional groups, and undergoes different forms of ionization through different media in the aqueous solution, and can exhibit the characteristics of an anionic or cationic surfactant. Amphoteric softeners are hydrophilic and biodegradable, and are a type of softener under development.
Navigation